Statement to the Governments of the Five Nuclear Weapon States

October, 2023| Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs (Gensuikyo)

Tokyo, Japan – Following the opening of the 78th Session of the UN General Assembly, the commemoration of the International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons on September 26 and the start of the First Committee deliberations in the first week of October, discussion on disarmament and security has started.

The world is now facing a grave crisis, such as the continuing war, killing and destruction as seen in the war in Ukraine, the danger of threat or use of nuclear weapons, intensifying confrontation and tension between nuclear powers, the expansion of military alliances and blocs, buildup of nuclear arsenals in the name of “modernization,” huge military expenditures totaling $2.24 trillion and massive arms buildup, etc. All of them run counter to the principles of the UN Charter and the desire for peace of the peoples of the world.

At the same time, the world is witnessing an overwhelming majority of public opinion to call for peaceful resolution of international conflicts, the prohibition of threat or use of force and a total ban and the elimination of nuclear weapons in defiance of retrogression of history. In addition, backed by this public opinion, the overwhelming majority of countries are continuing their efforts to achieve a “world without nuclear weapons”, based on the agreements made at the UN General Assembly and the NPT review conferences.

Nuclear-weapon-free zones were already established on five continents of the world and persistent efforts are continuing to achieve denuclearization of conflict-ridden regions such as the Middle East. The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) that was adopted in the UN, entered into force in January 2021, and with 92 signatories and 68 ratifiers, it has already begun to function as a substantive international law. The Second Meeting of States Parties to the TPNW is scheduled to open at UN Headquarters in New York on November 27.

The deliberations of the 78th UN General Assembly must be an opportunity to overcome the crisis facing humanity, restore peace and security, achieve a total ban and the elimination of nuclear weapons and drastic disarmament. These resources must be used for the well-being of humanity and to resolve the global issues we face, including those of environment, food, inequality and energy. To this end, the responsibility of the five nuclear weapon states is particularly grave, as they occupy permanent seats on the UN Security Council and are obligated under the NPT to conclude negotiations to cease the nuclear arms race and achieve nuclear disarmament.

While opposing the development, acquisition and possession of nuclear weapons by other countries, the nuclear weapon states claim that their nuclear weapons “guarantee security,” “deter aggression,” and “prevent war.” However, nuclear weapons not only fail to “deter” aggression and war, but on the contrary, escalate the danger, and if used, could even lead to the annihilation of the human race. The current situation itself clearly demonstrates this danger.

The war that led to the tragedies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 was caused by Japan’s aggression, but most of the 210,000 people killed by the two atomic bombs and many more who survived and became the Hibakusha, were civilians. Such sacrifices must never be repeated in any country. To this end, we request your governments to do the following:

  1. To abide by the UN Charter, which stipulates the settlement of international disputes by peaceful means, to immediately end war, and to never threaten or use force, especially nuclear weapons.
  2. To reaffirm and implement the first resolution of the UN General Assembly pledging the elimination of atomic weapons from national arsenals, the unequivocal undertaking to “accomplish the total elimination of their nuclear arsenals” agreed to at the NPT Review Conference in May 2000, and the agreement reached in 2010 to make special efforts to achieve “the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons” and to create a “framework” to achieve this goal; To immediately commence negotiations on NPT Article VI, “Effective measures relating to nuclear disarmament” and to “bring them to a conclusion” in accordance with the Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice.
  3. To recognize the TPNW as a “framework” for realizing a world without nuclear weapons, and to initiate procedures to support, sign and ratify the Treaty; To end reliance on the “nuclear deterrence” and “extended nuclear deterrence” policies that are actually aimed at threat or use of nuclear weapons.
  4. To participate as observers in the Second Meeting of States Parties to the TPNW and cooperate in its success.

Japan Council against A and H Bombs (Gensuikyo):
Tel: +81-3-5842-6034  Fax: +81-3-5842-6033
Email: antiatom@topaz.plala.or.jp

Location: Heiwa-to-Rodo-Center 6F, 2-4-4, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8464 JAPAN

Website: Website: http://www.antiatom.org/english/profile

The International Peace Bureau Has Seen It All Standing For Dialogue Also In Ukraine | Sean Conner

Meet Sean Conner, the executive director of the International Peace Bureau, one of the most vocal and oldest grass-root peace organisations in the world. For over 130 years the IPB has been lobbying governments and organisations for peaceful means to resolve conflicts. Even now they are one of the few organisations that stand for a negotiated end to the war in Ukraine and have not been corrupted or coerced into submission by the pro-war narrative of the collective west.

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#ConflictResolution #PeaceInUkraine #DialogueForPeace

Stop the Repression in the East and the West

The people and peace network calls on all people’s movements and parties to unitedly stand up against the persecution of independent voices of peace in East and West. Repression is increasing not only in Russia and Belarus, but also in Ukraine and also in EU countries.

This week it will be decided what punishment Boris Kagarlitsky will receive in Russia. During his detention, he was put on a list of terrorists and extremists by the authorities. He is accused by Russian security services of justifying terrorism for his war resistance.

In Kiev, Ukrainian security services boast of having stopped the “vicious Russian propagandist Yurii Sheliazhenko”. He is accused of justifying Russian aggression in a statement in which he explicitly condemns the Russian war of aggression.

In Lithuania, Belarusian pacifist Olga Karach risks being deported to Belarus with the threat of being imprisoned there. The regime-critical opponents and dissidents from Russia and Belarus who were recently well received are now increasingly seen as a national security threat in a xenophobic wave that has gained increasing political support in Lithuania.

In Sweden, pacifist organizations are subjected to slander in order to deprive them of public support and government grants. Strong movements that oppose the thrusts of militarism must be pushed out of the public conversation.

Regardless of our stance on the need for a ceasefire or sending arms to Ukraine, popular opposition to war is a factor of decisive importance. The support for non-armors and war opponents has been and is important no matter how much NATO propaganda says that the only way to peace is arms. Such support must be universal, otherwise it is has no value.

We call for joint action against oppression in East and West! Start by signing protests in support of Boris, Yurii and Olga! Spread the word and participate in uniting all against oppression wherever it occurs.

Links:
https://freeboris.info
https://ipb.org/justice-for-yurii-sheliazhenko
https://ipb.org/international-campaign-protection4olga

Adopted by the IPB 6 October 2023

Citizens Against US Wars of Aggression

Manila, Philippines – We, Citizens Against US Wars of Aggression (CAUSA), vehemently condemn the existential threat posed by US-warmongering in the Eastern Hemisphere and the canine devotion of the Philippine state to the whims of US hegemony. We decry the Marcos-Duterte administration’s intensification of its support for Washington’s geopolitical strategy of expanding its influence across the Eurasian landmass and the Indian and Pacific Oceans at the expense of the lives of Filipinos and other Asians.

As we speak, there are now 9 Philippine bases to be freely used by American troops under US-Ph Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement (EDCA). The Philippine government and military have also played host to military exercises including the biggest ever military exercise in April 2023, which saw an 18-day drill consisting of 17,000 troops – 5,000 Filipinos, 12,000 Americans, and 111 Australians. The Philippines has been fashioned into a “forward tripwire-state” which could transform the entire nation into a southern battlefront of impending war between the US and China over Taiwan.

There have even been shocking reports of the US deploying nuclear-armed submarines to the Korean Peninsula with these weapons of mass-destruction aimed directly at the People’s Republic of China. Humanity has not faced a calamitous threat such as this since the Cold War.

The US unveiled its Indo-Pacific Strategy last February 2023. It aims to create a “free and open Indo-Pacific” with the aim to uphold a “rules-based international order”. This rhetoric belies a desperate attempt to counteract the growing influence of Beijing in the Eurasia-Indo-Pacific strategic environment. IPS positions the Australia-United Kingdom-United States alliance (AUKUS) and Quadrilateral Security Dialogue (Quad) as core elements of this newly unified US-led regional security architecture that is suspected as the cutting edge of NATO’s expansion to Asia-Pacific. The Philippines is a de facto participant in this unfolding design because of its several defense and military agreements with Washington  as well as a Status of Visiting Forces Agreement (SOVFA) with Australia.

Lest we forget, integral to US war and militarization is the trafficking and exploitation of girls and women, resulting in prostitution, rape, and death. Even worse, women and children are simply reduced to mere collateral damage during actual wars. The big US bases in the Philippines prior to their withdrawal in 1992 spawned a massive sex industry, and the new bases are likely to do so again. Japan, another close ally of the US, remains adamant in not recognizing its war crimes and obligations to victims of sexual slavery and military sexual violence during World War II.  The US itself has still not paid reparations to Korean women who were converted into sex slaves for American troops during the Korean War.

We in CAUSA re-affirm the aspirations of governments in Asia and Africa at Bandung Conference of 1955 for peace, political self-determination, non-interference in internal affairs and mutual recognition and respect for equal sovereignty. We reiterate the spirit of the 1971 ASEAN Declaration of Peace, Freedom and Neutrality in recognizing the need for a nuclear-free world.

We in CAUSA believe, should the Philippines accept any invitation to join a US-led alliance of aggression, this would transform the defense forces of the country into integral military units operating under the US’s command and control. Every Filipino soldier, including students enlisted into the proposed Mandatory ROTC (MROTC) program, would become expendable pawns for the bottomless greed and ambition of the US Empire. Let us not allow our compatriots to be cannon-fodder for the US Empire!

Our alliance of citizens strongly advocates for an independent, non-aligned, anti-war foreign policy for our country, which has long suffered attacks on its sovereignty. We demand that our government act in the interest of our people rather than the military and economic interests and warlike designs of the US elite and military-industrial complex. Finally, we demand that the US government uphold its mandate to provide safety and security to its working class, instead of funneling their tax dollars to the US war machine, to its disastrous intervention and interference undermining sovereignty and democracy of nations, and to its blatant violations of human and democratic rights that stand in the way of its aggressive moves.

We call on all the masses of the Filipino people and the world to reject this doom-spiral of heightening military tension with its likely ending in nuclear war. Reject the narrative that increased militarization and war are our only options.! Resist the pro-war, pro-aggression, and anti-life propaganda! Demand a safe and just world for all of us and our children! No to WAR, yes to PEACE!!!

Scrap MDT, VFA, EDCA!

US Troops, Out Now!

Ban Weapons of Mass Destruction!

Resist AUKUS!

Resist Mandatory ROTC!

End US Wars of Aggression!

END RIMPAC, TALISMAN SABER, BALIKATAN and all War Exercises!

Joseph Gerson’s Speech on Past Time for Ukraine Ceasefire and Negotiations

30 September 2023, Berlin

During the opening of IPB’s Week of Global Mobilization for Peace in Ukraine (WGMPU) webinar, Dr. Joseph Gerson addressed the need to prevent nuclear escalation and the absence of arms control and strategic security diplomacy –

This week marks the Days of International Action for a Ukraine ceasefire and negotiations called in last June’s International Peace Summit in Vienna. The killing must stop, and potentially far worse geographical or vertical escalation must be prevented.

Recently Dr, Alexey Gromyko, the grandson of the longtime Soviet foreign minister and significant figure in the Russian establishment, addressed a German webinar. Two essential points stood out in his presentation.

First, this is the most dangerous moment in world history since 1962,  when the U.S. and the Soviet Union went eyeball to eyeball during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Back then the Kennedy Administration believed the chances of an apocalyptic U.S.-Soviet nuclear war were between a third and a half. It was also the occasion for a series of miscalculations. Unknown to most then and now is that we were brought to the brink of annihilation when a mistaken nuclear launch order was sent to a U.S. missile base in Okinawa and  when a nuclear armed Soviet submarine was attacked by depth charges in violation of Kennedy’s orders. We  were saved by a courageous Russian submarine officer who opted to lose rather than use his nuclear tipped torpedoes and by a U.S. missileer who chose to ignore the mistaken Okinawan launch order. Those decisions, luck,, and inspired  diplomacy which we lack today explain why we are still alive.

And again, today we are confronted by arrogant great power confrontations and the danger of nuclear annihilation.

Dr. Gromyko’s other point, which we needn’t love but must respect, helps to explain the urgency of today’s crisis. Victory in the Ukraine War is, he said,  a “key national security interest of Russia”, and “no nuclear power can accept losing a military conflict.” Fortunately, at this stage in the war, unlike February 24, 2022,  “victory” may consist of an armistice that leaves Moscow in control of Crimea and the devastated districts of Donetsk and Luhansk which it now occupies rather than the total defeat and functional elimination of the Ukrainian state.

The greatest danger we face would be if Kyiv threatened Moscow’s hold of Crimea, home to Moscow’s Black Sea fleet for almost three centuries. As one Russian general said in a track II exchange, if Crimea is threatened “All bets are off” in terms of Russian resort to its nuclear arsenal. The annexation of Crimea in 2014 violated the U.N. charter, but it was consistent with Russian history, with the current Russian empire’s perceived vital interests, and with popular support of the Russian identified majority there.

Sixty years ago, President Kenedy was prophetic when he advised that “while defending our own vital interests, nuclear powers must avert those confrontations which bring an adversary to a choice of either a humiliating retreat or a nuclear war. To adopt that kind of course in the nuclear age would be evidence only of the bankruptcy of our policy–or of a collective death-wish for the world.”

Regardless of rights and wrongs, NATO’s reckless expansion to Russia’s borders, the EU’s insistence that Kyiv sever all economic ties with Moscow to join the Economic Union, and Putin’s brutal preemptive and imperial invasion of Ukraine, the reality is that time is NOT on Ukraine’s side. And, as Tom Friedman wrote in the New York Times in the early days of the war, like it or not the war can only end with  a “dirty deal.”  Better now than later.

Which brings us to June’s International Peace Summit in Vienna and the urgent need for a ceasefire and negotiations.

We were more than 300 people from 32 countries, primarily from Europe, but also from the Global South and several from the U.S.. We were blessed with the courageous presence of Russian and Ukrainian peace advocates, at least one of whom is currently under house arrest for opposing the war. We certainly had our differences. Not least were those between the Italian labor and religious leaders who have organized the largest peace rallies to date,  who played a major role in organizing the Vienna Peace Summit, and who wanted to limit demands to ceasefire and negotiations one side. On the other side were the U.S. Peace In Ukraine Coalition representative and others who initially insisted that the Summit’s call include  condemnation of NATO imperialism and rejection of all arms transfers to Ukraine.

There was easy unity in condemning Russia’s invasion. And In the course respectful conversation fueled by the desperate appeal from Ukrainian and other delegates to stop the devastation and prevent escalation, and by the need for movement unity,  conference organizers unified around our call for ceasefire, negotiations, and this week’s days of international actions.

Two striking memories persist. First was the shock of learning that pressure from the Ukrainian government on the Austrian labor union that hosted the summit had led to cancellation of the conference site two days before we foreign delegates  descended on Vienna. Kyiv wanted to prevent the peace summit from happening. So much for Ukraine’s commitment to democracy!. An alternate was found.

Second was the  excellent speech by the former U.S. colonel and diplomat Ann Wright. She cut through rhetoric and criticisms that a ceasefire will leave Russian aggression in place, reminding those assembled that it took more than 500  meetings over the better part of two years to achieve the now 70 year old, if still fragile, Korean Armistice. In that light, she stressed the urgent need for negotiations to begin progress toward a ceasefire now!

 Before the war began, my hope was that diplomacy would prevent war and result in a neutral, non-NATO Ukraine, whose sovereignty, including the right to join the E.U,  would be credibly guaranteed, perhaps by the United Nations. That was discussed in Track II diplomatic sessions, and it is still my hope.

I also believe that it is in Ukraine’s interest to discard its ten point “peace” demands. Crimea will not be returned to Ukraine in our lifetimes, if ever. That is simply a fact of life. This war is stalemated, and the sacrifice of thousands of Ukrainian warriors’ lives to regain a few villages is a fool’s errand that also risks catastrophic military – including nuclear –  and geographic escalation of the war.

General Milley was correct when he warned that neither side can win this war militarily. Now, with its infinitely smaller economic and military production capacity, its much smaller population compounded by millions of its people refugeed across Europe, many of whom will never return to Ukraine, and with diminishing international support for a costly and endless war, it is in Ukraine’s national interest as well as ours to press for a ceasefire and negotiations.

President Zelensky does face threats to his rule, and maybe even his life, if he reduces his demands. This underscores the need for President  Biden to stop allowing the Ukrainian tail from wagging the American dog. Biden should give Zelinsky cover by insisting on negotiations and a ceasefire. Bidden should be declaring that it’s time for multi-layered and integrated negotiations:  Ukrainian-Russian, Russian-NATO, and U.S and-Russia.

This won’t be easy,. The Minsk accords and still secret Istanbul text are dead letters. Wars speed history and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has crystalized the post-Cold War emergence of a new multipolar disorder.  Finona Hill put it well when she said that Pax Americana is over. The U.S. is no longer able to almost unilaterally dictate the contours of the European order.  It is in our interest, Ukraine’s, and the world’s for the U.S. to insist on a ceasefire, to move to negotiations, and to adjust U.S. policies to the new multipolar reality.

*Dr. Joseph Gerson is President of the Campaign for Peace, Disarmament, and Common Security. He participated in the June International Peace Summit in Vienna and has participated in U.S.-Russian-European track II diplomatic discussions. This article is based on a speech given to the Sept. 30 Boston Peace in Ukraine rally.

For more details about the Week of Global Mobilization for Peace in Ukraine (WGMPU): please visit – https://bit.ly/WGMPU

Monitoring Report on the Situation of Belarusian Refugees in Lithuania

Regrettably, a concerning situation is unfolding in Lithuania, involving the rights of Belarusian refugees escaping the Lukashenko regime and compulsory military service.

In collaboration with Our House, we aim to provide you with their observational findings and recommendations for addressing the circumstances in Lithuania related to Belarusian political refugees and conscientious objectors from Belarus.

For instance, Belarusian female human rights activists in Lithuania are victimized in two ways: firstly, they are targeted by Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti (KGB) or Committee for State Security (CSS) espionage, and secondly, they face attacks from male Lithuanian human rights defenders. This double victimization places them in a distressing and even more vulnerable position, underscoring the urgent need for enhanced protection and support.

As one voice with Our House, the IPB respectfully calls for global attention to the escalating situation, which is becoming increasingly critical. More than 1700 Belarusians have been classified as posing a threat to Lithuania’s national security, resulting in a five-year ban from entering the European Union. Among this group, 910 individuals are currently at risk of deportation to Belarus.

Read the full monitoring reports:

1st Report: Situation of Belarusian Refugees in Lithuania

Conscientious Objection in Belarus Raises Alarming Human Rights Concerns, Particularly for Lithuanian Refugees. Despite recognized rights, Belarusian objectors face grave situations, including death penalty for desertion and strict military deferment laws. Perceptions of threat to Lithuania’s security are subjective, lacking legal clarity, relying on flexible interpretation.Refuge-seeking Belarusians opt for Russia, not endorsing policies but due to practical reasons like border ease. Female rights activists in Lithuania face dual victimization: KGB espionage and local attacks. Urgent protection needed.

[2nd Report] Situation of Belarusian Conscientious Objectors & Evaders in Lithuania

Our House presents the 2nd report on challenges faced by Belarusian migrants in Lithuania. Highlights include activist struggles, discrimination against conscientious objectors, “National Security Panic,” and hate speech instances. Urgent global attention needed as the situation intensifies. 1700+ Belarusians labeled threats, 910 facing deportation.

Authored by: International Centre for civil initiatives “Our House” (Nash Dom), Belarus & Lithuania

With the support of:

Publication date: August 2023

#HumanRights #Belarus #Lithuania #ConscientiousObjection #Protection4Olga

The NPT PrepCom 2023: IPB Side Events

From July 31 to August 3, 2023, the IPB had the pleasure of hosting three hybrid side events during the 2023 NPT Preparatory Committee at the United Nations in Vienna, Austria. These events aimed to foster the understanding of the challenges posed by nuclear weapons in the current political climate and the role of civil society in achieving nuclear disarmament. All three events received in person and online participation and were led by engaging Q&A discussions. 

July 31st, 2023: Nuke Free Europe: Nuclear Sharing and Threats

Nuke Free Europe: Nuclear Sharing and Other Threats  took place on July 31st with  speakers Alain Rouy (Mouvement de la Paix, France & IPB vice-President), Ludo de Brabander (Vrede, Belgium), Tom Unterrainer (Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, UK), and Marion Küpker (Association of Reconciliation, Germany), moderated by Emily Molinari (IPB, Germany). 

The event was attended by 25 participants in person, as well as 10 who joined on Zoom. Ludo de Brabander opened the session with an introduction to NATO policy and nuclear arms, including perspectives from the Netherlands and Belgium. Alain Rouy followed with a discussion on the dangers of France’s strategic orientation towards military capability strengthening and the disregard demonstrated in President Macron’s announcements regarding nuclear disarmament. Marion Küpker then gave an overview of nuclear sharing in Germany and presented the current campaigns to remove US nuclear weapons from the country. Tom Unterrainer concluded by reflecting on the role of the UK and its relationship with the US, in particular he referred to the stationing of US nuclear weapons and nuclear waste at the Lakenheath airbase, and the risks that nuclear development poses on a national, international and regional level.

This event highlighted the panorama of nuclear sharing within Europe, its ramifications on a global scale, and the imperativeness of nuclear abolition.

On August 2nd, the event “The Role of Nuclear Weapons in a Shifting Geopolitical Landscape” had 10 in person participants and 11 online attendees. The event was moderated by Alessandra Fontanella (IPB, Germany) and commenced with opening remarks by Sérgio Duarte (Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs) on the current geopolitical changes, including the war in Ukraine, China-US competition and the rise of the BRICS.

Kate Hudson (General Secretary of CND, UK) followed with a discussion on the potential positive and negative consequences of these changes on nuclear weapons and the action civil society can take to abolish them. Vanessa Lanteigne (Program Officer for Parliamentarians for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament) then explored the current projects and campaigns in nuclear arms control and the negative impact of the growing military & nuclear spending on climate change.  Stephanie Verlaan (Intern at the UN Office of Disarmament Affairs) brought the event to a close by focusing on youth’s pivotal contribution to nuclear disarmament, entwined with its wider implications within the evolving geopolitical landscape.

This event underscored the imperative of understanding the interplay between global shifts and nuclear weaponry by exploring the multifaceted repercussions of contemporary geopolitical changes, fostering a deeper comprehension of the crucial role civil society, ongoing initiatives, and the youth play in shaping the path towards nuclear disarmament within our evolving world order.

Our final event on August 3rdTechnology, Artificial Intelligence, and Nuclear Weapons” sought to draw attention to how newly developed and developing technologies can or already are being used in military strategy and warfare and the dangers they pose to nuclear security.

The event was attended by 15 participants, including representatives from the U.S Department of State and UNODA, and 19 online participants. It was moderated by Alain Rouy (Mouvement de la Paix, France & IPB vice-President). Dr. Michael Klare (Professor Emeritus at Five Colleges and Author) opened with a comprehensive overview on technology, AI and Nuclear weapons. He discussed how the weaponization of AI and other emerging technologies is increasing the risk of nuclear escalation and highlighted the danger of using automated command and control decision making systems with nuclear weapons. Our second speaker Jürgen Altmann (Physicist and Peace researcher at TU Dortmund University, Germany) explored military-technological Revolutions, military research and development, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and potential military applications.  Dr.  Altmann concluded by emphasizing the need for a reinvigoration of nuclear arms control. 

Given the novelty and significance of this discourse, it is crucial to consider the nexus between AI, technology, and nuclear weapons, especially in light of their pivotal relevance in today’s climate.

Visit IPB’s YouTube channel to watch all three side events!

IPB’s Vice President Alain Rouy with Emily Molinari and Alessandra Fontanella

Commemorating the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples with Sama Dilaut Documentary Screening

Embracing the significance of the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, we had the privilege to partake in the thoughtfully organized film screening hosted by the Philippine Embassy in Berlin, featuring Sama Dilaut Documentary Film. This documentary delved into the lives of the Sama Dilaut, also known as the Sama-Badjau, shining a light on the harsh realities faced by these indigenous communities in Tawi-Tawi, Philippines. Their forced transition from a sea-bound existence, compelled by armed conflicts, environmental degradation, and the expansion of commercial fishing, resonates profoundly.

The craftsmanship and heartfelt dedication poured into this film deserve the highest commendation. It is a poignant, thought-provoking masterpiece that opens our eyes to the intricate issues at hand. As Michael Venning, Executive Director of Indigenous Communities Learning Centres/Borneo Child Aid, poignantly expressed, the impact of climate change on indigenous communities is undeniably heart-wrenching, yet it ignites a call to action.

Director Christine Ramos shared her insights, emphasizing the film’s overarching goal: to create spaces and dialogues among community members, leaders, and institutions. These conversations hold the potential to foster constructive exchanges, ultimately catalyzing profound and positive transformations for the Sama Dilaut and other indigenous communities globally. Indeed, as Liza Florida, the film correspondent and creator of Eight Billion podcast, aptly stated, we are all part of a shared humanity.

A heartfelt appreciation goes out to Rhadem Musawah for extending the invitation to this enlightening film screening.

Congratulations to the Philippine Embassy in Germany for orchestrating this successful event.

To the dedicated team behind Sama Dilaut, we extend our best wishes for continued success. May your voices resonate louder and reach farther, ensuring that the messages of indigenous communities are heard with unwavering clarity.

Support:

  1. Sama Dilaut community through contacting the Indigenous Communities Learning Centres/Borneo Child Aid via email: staff@iclc-ngo.org or website:
    borneochildaid.org
  2. If you want to conduct film screening in your area, please contact Rhadem Musawah via rhademmusawah@gmail.com. This is available globally.
  3. Watch the Sama Dilaut film trailer.

#IndigenousPeoplesDay#SamaDilautFilm#PositiveChange#SharedHumanity

A nuclear weapon-free, peaceful and just world – Solidarity and actions of civil society

Message by Sean Conner, Executive Director, International Peace Bureau (IPB)

2023 World Conference against A and H Bombs

International Meeting – Session III

August 5, 2023

It is fundamentally impossible to have a peaceful and just world without the elimination of all nuclear weapons. The use or threat of use of nuclear arms is a crime against humanity and contrary to international law – the victims of nuclear weapons and testing are the strongest testimony to this fact. We must listen to them and spread their messages the world over – despite their tireless efforts, there are still far too many people who have not heard their firsthand accounts of the horror and destruction of these weapons. Moreover, the mere existence of nuclear weapons hinders efforts to build trust and accountability between nations and prevents true equality on the international stage. Nuclear armed states today can act with impunity and threaten the destruction of our planet to meet their interests at a cost to the rest of the world. Plain and simple, this is terrorism. All while risking war between nuclear-armed states – we know that nuclear deterrence is nothing but a myth – the most dangerous myth.

We must build and expand our coalition to create a wider base and strengthen our actions to pressure global leaders to eliminate these weapons. This is not an issue just for peace activists, but for all activists concerned with the future of our planet and humankind. Furthermore, non-nuclear armed states have a vital role to play in exerting pressure on nuclear-armed states. Activists across the entire world can increase this pressure and encourage our leaders to move away from nuclear destruction and toward a nuclear-free future.

Read the full script below:

Monday with Yurii

Let’s start the week with Yurii, debunking myths and providing updates on his case.

“I will not run from my home and my country; if I am sent to prison for pacifism, I will find a way to be useful for peace-loving Ukraine even in prison. I will think, write, and seek ways to contribute to a permanent worldwide dialogue on peace. I will educate fellow inmates about peace and human rights, and I will help them, especially if they are also political prisoners.”

In solidarity with Yurii, please support peace movements in your countries materially. Support Ukrainian peace and human rights activists, as well as his situation, by sharing information and providing funds. Give peace the budget!

As Yurii said today, together, through nonviolent action, scientific knowledge, faith, and hope, we can build a better world where everybody refuses to kill, thereby eliminating wars.

Yurii Sheliazhenko, an IPB Council Member and the Executive Secretary of the Ukrainian Pacifist Movement, is a legal scholar, journalist, writer, and human rights defender. IPB nominates the Ukrainian Pacifist Movement for the #2024NobelPeacePrize, along with two other organizations (Our House and the Movement of Conscientious Objectors), which focus on the right to conscientious objection.

Watch the full episode here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jcWh4F5XCPA